Nonclassical // Rise of the Machines
Live Music

Nonclassical // Rise of the Machines

£16.50

EXPERIMENTAL CLASSICAL CLUB NIGHT EXPLORING THE INFLUENCE OF COMPUTERS & AI ON MUSIC, FEAT. 30-PIECE ORCHESTRA, LIVE EXPERIMENTAL ELECTRONICS & NONCLASSICAL DJS.

Rise of the Machines #2 showcases the world premiere of the first ever Concerto for Drum Machine & Orchestra, a work in five parts which places the drum machine centre stage as solo musical instrument, bringing the sounds of dance music and hip-hop to the classical world.

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Conductor: Jessica Cottis. Hailed in the UK music press as “one to watch”, Jessica Cottis possesses intellectual rigour, innate musicality and an easy authority; she is a charismatic figure on the podium who brings dynamism, intensity and clarity of vision to all her performances.
Langham Research Centre, founded in 2003 by BBC Radio 3 producers, work with vintage equipment to perform 20th century classic electronic repertoire.

Nonclassical DJs, including Laurence Osborn.

PROGRAMME
Concerto for Drum Machine & Orchestra (2017) – *world premiere*
One movement composed by each of: Beni Giles, Laurence Osborn, Josephine Stephenson, Jo Thomas, Max de Wardener

Nick Ryan & John Matthias: Cortical Songs (2008)
A work for string ensemble and solo violin in which the orchestra is partially controlled by the neural patterns of a tiny computer brain. The resultant work takes the orchestra into an ethereal sound world of lush strings juxtaposed with the skittering crackles of neural activity.

Barry Guy: Mr Babbage is Coming to Dinner! (2015)
This piece was inspired by Charles Babbage’s Difference Engine No2 and was commissioned by the NMC. The graphic score hand-drawn and partially coloured by Barry Guy is a work of art in itself. It calls on spontaneity and improvisation from the orchestra.

Magnus Lindberg: Engine (1996)
The title of this piece is inspired by the computing language associated with using the Patchwork1 programme. “Engine” is a sort of generator of musical material, which operates according to the rules pre-established by the composer. The texture is composed by the machine, on which the composer imposes dozens of constraints2.

Part of Convergence 2018
Funded through Arts Council England and PRS Foundation’s The Open Fund.

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